Last edited by Zolorg
Thursday, May 21, 2020 | History

2 edition of Soviet arms transfers to the Middle East in the 1970"s found in the catalog.

Soviet arms transfers to the Middle East in the 1970"s

Efraim Karsh

Soviet arms transfers to the Middle East in the 1970"s

by Efraim Karsh

  • 144 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Tel Aviv University, Distributed by Jerusalem Post in [Tel Aviv] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Soviet Union,
  • Middle East,
  • Middle East.,
  • Soviet Union.
    • Subjects:
    • Military assistance, Soviet -- Middle East.,
    • Arms transfers -- Soviet Union.,
    • Arms transfers -- Middle East.,
    • Soviet Union -- Military relations -- Middle East.,
    • Middle East -- Military relations -- Soviet Union.

    • Edition Notes

      Bibliography: p. 44-47.

      StatementEfraim Karsh.
      SeriesPaper / Jaffee Center for Strategic Studies,, no. 22 (Dec. 1983), Paper (Merkaz le-meḥḳarim asṭraṭegiyim ʻal shem Yafeh) ;, no. 22.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsUA12 .K29 1983
      The Physical Object
      Pagination47 p. ;
      Number of Pages47
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2926544M
      LC Control Number84161219

      Moscow has long been the world’s second largest arms exporter after the US, with average annual income in −15 reaching $ billion. But over the past decade, it has particularly increased its arms exports to the Middle East, part of a broader Russian strategy of re .   Accordingly, the s saw several huge arms deals between Moscow and Beijing. One of the most important involved the sale, licensing, and technology transfer .

      These essays overlap various published studies and occasionally overlap each other, but the book as a whole does achieve the stated purpose of bringing the subject closer to the present and airing fresh perceptions and interpretations. As for the rest of the s, there is not much more for Western observers to say until the Andropov leadership shows more of its hand on Middle East policy. expression to Soviet interests in the Indian Ocean and in the Southeast Asian region. The following discussion is focussed on Soviet inte­ rests in Southeast Asia since the middle s. It begins with a survey of Moscow’s involvement with the revolutionary movements of the region.

      History. The Rogers Plan was publicly proposed in a December 9, speech at an Adult Education conference. The December speech followed the failure of the Jarring Mission to negotiate an implementation plan for UN Security Council Resolution among the principals in the Six-Day War.. Some of the points included in Rogers' ten-point paper called for the following. A one of a kind dystopian novel, such literature was unheard of in the Soviet Union. In the eyes of the government and the people, We mocked the communist regime and presented an unlikable image of the communist future that the country was eagerly fighting for. The novel is filled with allusions to Zamyatin’s own experience of Soviet life and references the Russian Civil War, which ended.


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Soviet arms transfers to the Middle East in the 1970"s by Efraim Karsh Download PDF EPUB FB2

Soviet arms transfers to the Middle East in the 's. [Tel Aviv]: Tel Aviv University: Distributed by Jerusalem Post, © (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All.

tries in Africa and the Middle East which equipped their armies with Soviet weapons now find that they cannot change to an arms supplier other than one of the members of the CIS. As a rule the Soviet Union prevented arms from being exported to countries which could take aggressive actions that would destabilize the situation in a region.

Read the full-text online edition of Soviet Policy toward the Middle East since (). Home» Browse» Books» Book details, Soviet Policy toward the Middle East since Soviet Policy toward the Middle East since This support enabled me to travel to the Middle East and to the Soviet Union.

I would like to thank the. Home Cold War Era The Myth of Soviet Arms and Tactics in the Middle East, Part Two: The Six-Day War, the War of Attrition and the Yom Kippur War Cold War Era Military Aviation The Myth of Soviet Arms and Tactics in the Middle East, Part Two: The Six-Day War, the War of Attrition and the Yom Kippur War.

Arab Middle East. At least 70 percent of all Soviet arms sales to the non-communist developing countries in the s went to the Arab Middle East. In the Soviet Union was the primary supplier for five of the seven major arms-importing states in the.

The secrecy surrounding Soviet military cooperation and weapons transfers to the Middle East was related to the fact that Moscow tried to hide the real scope of its support for proxy Arab regimes in an attempt to present their anti-West policies as an indigenous struggle.

During the last, which began inthe military aspects of Soviet conduct have become more pronounced: the export of arms grew; intervention in conflicts in Africa, the Middle East, and Southwest Asia occurred in ways that demonstrated the growth of Soviet power and confidence; the Soviet navy visited developing countries more frequently and.

This is a comprehensive study of Soviet policies in the Middle East. Concentrating on policy developments, Professor Golan analyses the major Soviet decisions and objectives from the end of World War II to the Gorbachev era.

She pays particular attention to the wars and crises of recent years and the often problematic development of political relationships in the region. The SIPRI Arms Transfers Database. Deals and Trend Indicator Values. Choose Output Format: Choose years and countries: On Screen Excel File File name: (CSV file: Semicolon delimited) From.

Inthe Soviet intelligence service, the KGB, looked at its mistakes in the Middle East, where the CIA often had the upper hand. Putin has worked to change that.

In order to combat the growing Soviet presence in the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America, Washington began supplying vast quantities of arms and ammunition to its own allies in these regions— thereby triggering fresh Soviet arms transfers to its Third World clients, in what was to become an ongoing pattern of U.S.–Soviet arms competition.

With superpower tensions rising in the Middle East and elsewhere, the two sides discontinued the talks at the end of Ronald Reagan, who became president inrepudiated what little survived of the Carter arms policy and promised to expand U.S.

military aid to threatened allies abroad. all happy about the continued indirect transfer of arms to Iran. Thus, even after direct Soviet arms transfers to Baghdad were resumed, Iraq moved to improve its rela­ tions with the West, including the United States.

InWashington and Baghdad restored diplomatic re­ lations, which had been cut off since In the broader Middle East context, the Soviet Union was widely. Preface. The Cold War and how it played out in the Middle East have fascinated me for many years. I began researching Soviet policy in the region in the mids.

By the mids the export of Soviet arms expanded into the Middle East and were immediately sent to war. Forming the backbone of, amongst others, the air forces of Iraq and Syria, Soviet aircraft were involved in major conflicts such as the Suez Crisis, the Six-Day and Yom Kippur Wars, the Iran-Iraq War, the First and Second Gulf Wars and, more recently, the civil war in s: Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev greets Egyptian president Anwar Sadat, who was in Moscow in October seeking diplomatic support and military hardware against Israel.

Soviet strategy in the Middle East from to was subordinate to Soviet strategy toward Indochina. In response to the escalating war in Vietnam afterthe Soviets supplied many. Expanding on the notion that a key goal of the Soviet Union in the Middle East in the s was to expand its military presence through the procurement of both naval and air bases.

[31] Furthermore, the Soviets chose to involve Egypt in the conflict due to the fear that an incident between Syria and Israel would likely lead to Syria's defeat. [32]. Well, let’s review the story of the ‘Soviet Arms and Tactics in the Middle East’ of, say, ss period.

From Palestine War to Suez Crisis. During the Palestine War (for Arabs) or Independence War (for the Israelis), foughtneither side used ‘Soviet’ arms, tactics or else. Get this from a library.

Arms for the Arabs: the Soviet Union and war in the Middle East. [Jon D Glassman] -- Reviews and assesses the motivations, strategies, and impact of Soviet political and military assistance to Egypt and Syria in the, and Arab-Israeli wars.

Soviet Role in the Middle East Overview The Soviet economic and military presence in the Arab states, built up since the mids, has been eroding since the October Arab-Israeli war. As a result, the Soviets' modest political influence has been diminishing also. Over the last decade, the Middle East has become a focal point of the world arms buildup.

Each year, the regional arsenal grows, as the United States, the Soviet Union, France, Britain and others ship billions of dollars worth of weapons to the countries there. During the s, while the world arms trade doubled, Middle East arms imports rose fourfold (in constant dollars).

[1] Today, the. President Lyndon Johnson focused much of his energies on his Great Society programs at home and the Vietnam War abroad. The Middle East burst back onto the American foreign policy radar with the Six-Day War ofwhen Israel, after rising tension and threats from all sides, pre-empted what it characterized as an impending attack from Egypt, Syria, and Jordan.In the yearsRussian arms exports to the Middle East exceeded $2 billion and those of the US totaled $ billion.

2 Russia’s arms exports to the Middle East increased rapidly in the second half of the s, at a much faster rate than those of.